Entries tagged esp8266

Related tags: 3d-printing, 3dhubs, arduino.

Security is hard ..

Tuesday, 30 May 2017

3D-Printing

I continued to be impressed with local vendors, found on 3dhubs. I've had several more things printed out, including an "internet button", and some card-holders for Settlers of Catan.

The most recent print I had made was a collection of display cases, for holding an OLED display, as well as an ESP8266 device.

Unfortunately at the same time as I was falling in love with the service I discovered a glaring XSS attack against the site itself.

Anybody who viewed my profile page could have arbitrary javascript executed, which in some cases would actually disclose their private details - such as:

  • Their forename & surname.
  • Their email-address.
  • Their telephone number.
  • Their GeoIP details.

Discovering this took minutes, writing it up took an hour, and a month later it is still unfixed.

I've deleted my account.

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3d-Printing is cool

Thursday, 20 April 2017

I've heard about 3d-printing a lot in the past, although the hype seems to have mostly died down. My view has always been "That seems cool", coupled with "Everybody says making the models is very hard", and "the process itself is fiddly & time-consuming".

I've been sporadically working on a project for a few months now which displays tram-departure times, this is part of my drive to "hardware" things with Arduino/ESP8266 devices . Most visitors to our flat have commented on it, at least once, and over time it has become gradually more and more user-friendly. Initially it was just a toy-project for myself, so everything was hard-coded in the source but over time that changed - which I mentioned here, (specifically the Access-point setup):

  • When it boots up, unconfigured, it starts as an access-point.
    • So you can connect and configure the WiFi network it should join.
  • Once it's up and running you can point a web-browser at it.
    • This lets you toggle the backlight, change the timezone, and the tram-stop.
    • These values are persisted to flash so reboots will remember everything.

I've now wired up an input-button to the device too, experimenting with the different ways that a single button can carry out multiple actions:

  • Press & release - toggle the backlight.
  • Press & release twice - a double-click if you like - show a message.
  • Press, hold for 1 second, then release - re-sync the date/time & tram-data.

Anyway the software is neat, and I can't think of anything obvious to change. So lets move onto the real topic of this post: 3D Printing.

I randomly remembered that I'd heard about an online site holding 3D-models, and on a whim I searched for "4x20 LCD". That lead me to this design, which is exactly what I was looking for. Just like open-source software we're now living in a world where you can get open-source hardware! How cool is that?

I had to trust the dimensions of the model, and obviously I was going to mount my new button into the box, rather than the knob shown. But having a model was great. I could download it, for free, and I could view it online at viewstl.com.

But with a model obtained the next step was getting it printed. I found a bunch of commercial companies, here in Europe, who would print a model, and ship it to me, but when I uploaded the model they priced it at €90+. Too much. I'd almost lost interest when I stumbled across a site which provides a gateway into a series of individual/companies who will print things for you, on-demand: 3dhubs.

Once again I uploaded my model, and this time I was able to select a guy in the same city as me. He printed my model for 1/3-1/4 of the price of the companies I'd found, and sent me fun pictures of the object while it was in the process of being printed.

To recap I started like this:

hardware-button

Then I boxed it in cardboard which looked better than nothing, but still not terribly great:

hardware-boxed

Now I've found an online case-design for free, got it printed cheaply by a volunteer (feels like the wrong word, after-all I did pay him), and I have something which look significantly more professional:

hardware-3d-printed

Inside it looks as neat as you would expect:

case internals

Of course the case still cost 5 times as much as the actual hardware involved (button: €0.05, processor-board €2.00 and LCD I2C display €3.00). But I've gone from being somebody who had zero experience with hardware-based projects 4 months ago, to somebody who has built a project which is functional and "pretty".

The internet really is a glorious thing. Using it for learning, and coding is good, using it for building actual physical parts too? That's something I never could have predicted a few years ago and I can see myself doing it more in the future.

Sure the case is a little rough around the edges, but I suspect it is now only a matter of time until I learn how to design my own models. An obvious extension is to add a status-LED above the switch, for example. How hard can it be to add a new hole to a model? (Hell I could just drill it!)

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I've built a product, not a project

Thursday, 2 February 2017

The past few days I've been doing more arduino-work. In between dying of sleep-exhaustion.

One thing that always annoyed me was that I had to hard-code my WiFi credentials in my projects, with code like this:

//
// Connect to the SCOTLAND network
//
WiFi.mode(WIFI_STA);
WiFi.hostname("tram-clock");
WiFi.begin("SCOTLAND", "highlander1");

//
// Attempt to connect - TODO: Timeout on failure
//
while (WiFi.status() != WL_CONNECTED)
    delay(500);

//
// Now we're connected show the local IP address.
//
lcd.print("WiFi connected  ");
lcd.print(WiFi.localIP());

Whilst looking at another project I found a great solution though. There is a library called WiFiManager which behaves perfectly:

  • If you've stored connection details it will connect to the local WiFI network using those, automatically.
  • If you've not saved previous connection details it will instead configure the device to work as an Access Point
    • You can then connect to that access point and see a list of local WiFi networks.
    • Choose the appropriate one from the list, enter your password, and these details are saved for the future.
    • The device will then reset, join the network via your saved choices and acquire an IP via DHCP as you'd expect.

The code for this is beautifully simple:

//
// Connect to WiFI with saved credentials, if any.
//
// Otherwise work as an access-point, named TRAM-TIMES, and
// let the user fill out their details.
//
WiFiManager wifiManager;
wifiManager.autoConnect("TRAM-TIMES");

This means my current project, which continues to revolve around tram-times, is so very much more user-friendly. It is a product you could package and take to a friends house, not a project you have to recompile to tweak.

For that reason, user-niceness, I reworked the on-board HTTP status-page to use bootstrap, be themed, and look nicer. Other than being housed in a horrid case the project actually looks like a product. Not one I'd buy, but neither one I'm ashamed of sharing.

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So I've been playing with hardware

Saturday, 28 January 2017

At the end of December I decided I was going to do hardware "things", and so far that has worked out pretty well.

One of the reasons I decided to play with Arduinos is that I assumed I could avoid all forms of soldering. I've done soldering often enough to know I can manage it, but not quite often enough that I feel comfortable doing so.

Unfortunately soldering has become a part of my life once again, as too many of the things I've been playing with have required pins soldering to them before I can connect them.

Soldering aside I've been having fun, and I have deployed several "real" projects in and around my flat. Perhaps the most interesting project shows the arrival time of the next tram to arrive at the end of my street:

That's simple, reliable, and useful. I have another project which needs to be documented which combineds a WeMos D1 and a vibration sensor - no sniggers - to generate an alert when the washing machine is done. Having a newborn baby around the place means that we have a lot of laundry to manage, and we keep forgetting that we've turned the washing machine on. Oops.

Anyway. Hardware. More fun than I expected. I've even started ordering more components for bigger projects.

I'll continue to document the various projects online, mostly to make sure I remember the basics:

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