Entries tagged pam

Related tags: apache2, bayesian filtering, haveibeenpwned, kernels, linux, spam.

PAM HaveIBeenPwned module

Monday, 17 September 2018

So the PAM module which I pondered about in my previous post now exists:

I did mention "sponsorship" in my post which lead to a couple of emails, and the end result of that was that a couple of folk donated to charity in my/its name. Good enough.

Perhaps in the future I'll explore patreon/similar, but I don't feel very in-demand so I'll avoid it for the moment.

Anyway I guess it should be Debian-packaged for neatness, but I'll resist for the moment.

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Recommendations for software?

Saturday, 15 September 2018

A quick post with two questions:

  • What spam-filtering software do you recommend?
  • Is there a PAM module for testing with HaveIBeenPwnd?
    • If not would you sponsor me to write it? ;)

So I've been using crm114 to perform spam-filtering on my incoming mail, via procmail, for the past few years.

Today I discovered it had archived about 12Gb of my email history, because I'd never pruned it. (Beneath ~/.crm/.)

So I wonder if there are better/simpler/different Bayesian-filters out there at that I should be switching to? Recommendations welcome - but don't say "SpamAssassin", thanks!

Secondly the excellent Have I Been Pwned site provides an API which allows you to test if a password has been previously included in a leak. This is great, and I've integrated their API in a couple of my own applications, but I was thinking on the bus home tonight it might be worth tying into PAM.

Sure in the interests of security people should use key-based authentication for SSH, but .. most people don't. Even so, if keys are used exclusively, a PAM module would allow you to validate the password which is used for sudo hasn't previously been leaked.

So it seems like there is value in a PAM module to do a lookup at authentication-time, via libcurl.

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I would have started with lasers, eight o'clock, Day One

Friday, 22 August 2008

This week has been a little hectic, as I've been struggling with testing different versions of the GNU/Linux kernel.

Specifically I've been trying to solve a problem where a Phenom processor, when coupled with 8Gb, would kernel panic under heavy load.

After testing various patches, kernel versions, and random things I believe the problem is fixed in the kernel version 2.6.27RC4 - however nothing in the changelog appears relevant, so I guess only time will tell.

Now we need to solve the problem of Atom processors panicing when attempting to boot 64-bit kernels. That is still present in the 2.6.27RC4 kernel.

(ObRandom: If there are any interested parties I can provide remote serial console access to such a system.)

Finally I've also been playing with PAM, the plugabble authentication module. Again specific use-case here. At work we want to allow people to ssh to some systems (to access serial consoles, etc), and we wish their connections to be tested against our internal single-sign-on mechanism.

That could have meant a whole new PAM module, which would do XML-RPC-fu. Instead it meant packaging libpam-external - which is a neat PAM module allowing you to specify a shellscript to validate users & passwords.

(libpam-external is very similar to mod_authnz_external which is a similar pluggable Apache2 module)

So, this week "kernel hacking", & "pam hacking". Does that make me a real developer now?

ObQuote: Time Bandits

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