Entries posted in October 2015

It begins - a new mail client, with lua scripting

Monday, 26 October 2015

Once upon a time I wrote a mail-client, which worked in the console directly via Maildir manipulation.

My mail client was written in C++, and used Lua for scripting unlike clients such as mutt, alpine, and similar alternatives which don't have complete scripting support.

I've pondered several times whether to restart this project, but I think it is the right thing to do.

The original lumail client has a rich API, but it is very ad-hoc and random. Functions were added where they seemed like a good idea, but with no real planning, and although there are grouped functions that operate similarly there isn't a lot of consistency. The implementation is clean in places, elegant in others, and horrid in yet more parts.

This time round everything is an object, accessible to Lua, with Lua, and for Lua. This time round all the drawing-magic is will be written in Lua.

So to display a list of Maildirs I create a bunch of objects, one for each Maildir, and then the Lua function Maildir.to_string is called. That function looks like this:

--
-- This method returns the text which is displayed when a maildir is
-- to be show in maildir-mode.
--
function Maildir.to_string(self)
   local total  = self:total_messages()
   local unread = self:unread_messages()
   local path   = self:path()

   local output = string.format( "[%05d / %05d] - %s", unread, total, path );

   if ( unread > 0 ) then
      output = "$[RED]" .. output
   end

   if ( string.find( output, "Automated." ) ) then
      output = strip_colour( output )
      output = "$[YELLOW]" .. output
   end

   return output
end

The end result is something that looks like this:


[00001 / 00010 ] - Amazon.de
[00000 / 00023 ] - Automated.root

The formatting can thus be adjusted clearly, easily, and without hacking the core of the client. Providing I implement the apporpriate methods to the Maildir object.

It's still work in progress. You can view maildirs, view indexes, and view messages. You cannot reply, forward, or scroll properly. That said the hard part is done now, and I'm reasonably happy with it.

The sample configuration file is a bit verbose, but a good demonstration regardless.

See the code, if you wish, online here:

| 2 comments.

 

Robbing Peter to pay Paul, or location spoofing via DNS

Saturday, 17 October 2015

I rarely watched TV online when I was located in the UK, but now I've moved to Finland with appalling local TV choices it has become more common.

The biggest problem with trying to watch BBC's iPlayer, and similar services, is the location restrictions.

Not a huge problem though:

  • Rent a virtual machine.
  • Configure an OpenVPN server on it.
  • Connect from $current-country to it.

The next part is the harder one - making your traffic pass over the VPN. If you were simple you'd just say "Send everything over the VPN". But that would slow down local traffic, so instead you have to use trickery.

My approach was just to run a series of routing additions, similar to this (except I did it in the openvpn configuration, via pushed-routes):

ip -4 route add .... dev tun0

This works, but it is a pain as you have to add more and more routes. The simpler solution which I switched to after a while was just configuring mitmproxy on the remote OpenVPN end-point, and then configuring that in the browser. With that in use all your traffic goes over the VPN link, if you enable the proxy in your browser, but nothing else will.

I've got a network device on-order, which will let me watch netflix, etc, from my TV, and I'm lead to believe this won't let you setup proxies, or similar, to avoid region-bypass.

It occurs to me that I can configure my router to give out bogus DNS responses - if the device asks for "iplayer.bbc.com" it can return 10.10.10.10 - which is the remote host running the proxy.

I imagine this will be nice and simple, and thought I was being clever:

  • Remote OpenVPN server.
  • MITM proxy on remote VPN-host
    • Which is basically a transparent HTTP/HTTPS proxy.
  • Route traffic to it via DNS.
    • e.g. For any DNS request, if it ends in .co.uk return 10.10.10.10.

Because I can handle DNS-magic on the router I can essentially spoof my location for all the devices on the internal LAN, which is a good thing.

Anyway I was reasonably pleased with the idea of using DNS to route traffic over the VPN, in combination with a transparent proxy. I was even going to blog about it, and say "Hey! This is a cool idea I've never heard of before".

Instead I did a quick google(.fi) and discovered that there are companies offering this as a service. They don't mention the proxying bit, but it's clearly what they're doing - for example OverPlay's SmartDNS.

So in conclusion I can keep my current setup, or I can use the income I receive from DNS hosting to pay for SmartDNS, or other DNS-based location-fakers.

Regardless. DNS. VPN. Good combination. Try it if you get bored.

| 8 comments.

 

So about that idea of using ssh-keygen on untrusted input?

Monday, 12 October 2015

My previous blog post related to using ssh-keygen to generate fingerprints from SSH public keys.

At the back of my mind was the fear that running the command against untrusted, user-supplied, keys might be a bad plan. So I figured I'd do some fuzzing to reassure myself.

The most excellent LWN recently published a piece on Fuzzing with american fuzzy lop, so with that to guide me I generated a pair of SSH public keys, and set to work.

Two days later I found an SSH public key that would make ssh-keygen segfault, and equally the SSH client (same parser), so that was a shock.

The good news is that my Perl module to fingerprint keys is used like so:

my $helper = SSHKey::Fingerprint->new( key => "ssh ...." );
if ( $helper->valid() ) {
   my $fingerprint = $helper->fingerprint();
   ...
}

The validity-test catches my bogus key, so in my personal use-cases this OK. That said it's a surprise to see this:

skx@shelob ~ $ ssh -i key.trigger.pub steve@ssh.steve.org.uk 
Segmentation fault

Similarly running "ssh-keygen -l -f ~/key.trigger.pub" results in an identical segfault.

In practice this is a low risk issue, hence mentioning it, and filing the bug-report publicly, even if code execution is possible. Because in practice how many times do people fingerprint keys from unknown sources? Except for things like githubs key management page?

Some people probably do it, but I assume they do it infrequently and only after some minimal checking.

Anyway we'll say this is my my first security issue of 2015, we'll call it #roadhouse, and we'll get right on trademarking the term, designing the logo, and selling out for all the filthy filthy lucre ;)

| 3 comments.

 

Generating fingerprints from SSH keys

Wednesday, 7 October 2015

I've been allowing users to upload SSH public-keys, and displaying them online in a form. Displaying an SSH public key is a pain, because they're typically long. That means you need to wrap them, or truncate them, or you introduce a horizontal scroll-bar.

So rather than displaying them I figured I'd generate a fingerprint when the key was uploaded and show that instead - This is exactly how github shows your ssh-keys.

Annoyingly there is only one reasonable way to get a fingerprint from a key:

  • Write it to a temporary file.
  • Run "ssh-keygen -lf temporary/file/name".

You can sometimes calculate the key via more direct, but less obvious methods:

awk '{print $2}' ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub | base64 -d | md5sum

But that won't work for all key-types.

It is interesting to look at the various key-types which are available these days:

mkdir ~/ssh/
cd ~/ssh/
for i in dsa ecdsa ed25519 rsa rsa1 ; do
  ssh-keygen -P "" -t $i -f ${i}-key
done

I've never seen an ed25519 key in the wild. It looks like this:

$ cat ~/ssh/ed25519-key.pub
ssh-ed25519 AAAAC3NzaC1lZDI1NTE5AAAAIMcT04t6UpewqQHWI4gfyBpP/ueSjbcGEze22vdlq0mW skx@shelob

Similarly curve-based keys are short too, but not as short:

ecdsa-sha2-nistp256 AAAAE2VjZHNhLXNoYTItbmlzdHAyNTYAAAAIbmlzdHAyNTYAAABBBLTJ5+  \
 rWoq5cNcjXdhzRiEK3Yq6tFSYr4DBsqkRI0ZqJdb+7RxbhJYUOq5jsBlHUzktYhOahEDlc9Lezz3ZUqXg= skx@shelob

Remember what I said about wrapping? Ha!

Anyway for the moment I've hacked up a simple perl module SSH::Key::Fingerprint which will accept a public key and return the fingerprint, as well as validating the key is well-formed and of a known-type. I might make it public in the future, but I think the name is all wrong.

The only code I could easily find to do a similar job is this node.js package, but it doesn't work on all key-types. Shame.

And that concludes this weeks super-happy fun-time TODO-list item.

| 4 comments.

 

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