Entries posted in July 2018

Project cleanup

Friday, 27 July 2018

For the past couple of days I've gone back over my golang projects, and updated each of them to have zero golint/govet warnings.

Nothing significant has changed, but it's nice to be cleaner.

I did publish a new project, which is a webmail client implemented in golang. Using it you can view the contents of a remote IMAP server in your browser:

  • View folders.
  • View messages.
  • View attachments
  • etc.

The (huge) omission is the ability to reply to messages, compose new mails, or forward/delete messages. Still as a "read only webmail" it does the job.

Not a bad hack, but I do have the problem that my own mailserver presents ~/Maildir over IMAP and I have ~1000 folders. Retrieving that list of folders is near-instant - but retrieving that list of folders and the unread-mail count of each folder takes over a minute.

For the moment I've just not handled folders-with-new-mail specially, but it is a glaring usability hole. There are solutions, the two most obvious:

  • Use an AJAX call to get/update the unread-counts in the background.
    • Causes regressions as soon as you navigate to a new page though.
  • Have some kind of open proxy-process to maintain state and avoid accessing IMAP directly.
    • That complicates the design, but would allow "instant" fetches of "stuff".

Anyway check it out if you like. Bug reports welcome.

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Automating builds via CI

Sunday, 15 July 2018

Gitlab is something I've no interest in self-hosting, and Jenkins is an abomination, so I figured I'd write down what kind of things I did and explore options again. My use-cases are generally very simple:

  • I trigger some before-steps
    • Which mostly mean pulling a remote git repository to the local system.
  • I then start a build.
    • This means running debuild, hugo, or similar.
    • This happens in an isolated Docker container.
  • Once the build is complete I upload the results somehere.
    • Either to a Debian package-pool, or to a remote host via rsync.

Running all these steps inside a container is well-understood, but I cheat. It is significantly easier to run the before/after steps on your host - because that way you don't need to setup SSH keys in your containers, and that is required when you clone (private) remote repositories, or wish to upload to hosts via rsync over SSH.

Anyway I wrote more thoughts here:

Then I made it work. So that was nice.

To complete the process I also implemented a simple HTTP-server which will list all available jobs, and allow you to launch one via a click. The output of the build is streamed to your client in real-time. I didn't bother persisting output and success/failure to a database, but that would be trivial enough.

It'll tide me over until I try ick again, anyway. :)

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Odroid-go initial impressions

Friday, 13 July 2018

Recently I came across a hacker news post about the Odroid-go, which is a tiny hand-held console, somewhat resembling a gameboy.

In terms of hardware this is powered by an ESP32 chip, which is something I'm familiar with due to my work on Arduino, ESP8266, and other simple hardware projects.

Anyway the Odroid device costs about $40, can be programmed via the Arduino-studio, and comes by default with a series of emulators for "retro" hardware:

  • Game Boy (GB)
  • Game Boy Color (GBC)
  • Game Gear (GG)
  • Nintendo Entertainment System (NES)
  • Sega Master System (SMS)

I figured it was cheap, and because of its programmable nature it might be fun to experiment with. Though in all honesty my intentions were mostly to play NES games upon it. The fact that it is programmable means I can pretend I'm doing more interesting things than I probably would be!

Most of the documentation is available on this wiki:

The arduino setup describes how to install the libraries required to support the hardware, but then makes no mention of the board-support required to connect to an ESP32 device.

So to get a working setup you need to do two things:

  • Install the libraries & sample-code.
  • Install the board-support.

The first is documented, but here it is again:

 git clone https://github.com/hardkernel/ODROID-GO.git \
     ~/Arduino/libraries/ODROID-GO

The second is not documented. In short you need to download the esp32 hardware support via this incantation:

    mkdir -p ~/Arduino/hardware/espressif && \
     cd ~/Arduino/hardware/espressif && \
     git clone https://github.com/espressif/arduino-esp32.git esp32 && \
     cd esp32 && \
     git submodule update --init --recursive && \
     cd tools && \
     python2 get.py

(This assumes that you're using ~/Arduino for your code, but since almost everybody does ..)

Anyway the upshot of this should be that you can:

  • Choose "Tools | Boards | ODROID ESP32" to select the hardware to build for.
  • Click "File | Examples |ODROID-Go | ...." to load a sample project.
    • This can now be compiled and uploaded, but read on for the flashing-caveat.

Another gap in the instructions is that uploading projects fails. Even when you choose the correct port (Tools | Ports | ttyUSB0). To correct this you need to put the device into flash-mode:

  • Turn it off.
  • Hold down "Volume"
  • Turn it on.
  • Click Upload in your Arduino IDE.

The end result is you'll have your own code running on the device, as per this video:

Enough said. Once you do this when you turn the device on you'll see the text scrolling around. So we've overwritten the flash with our program. Oops. No more emulation for us!

The process of getting the emulators running, or updated, is in two-parts:

  • First of all the system firmware must be updated.
  • Secondly you need to update the actual emulators.

Confusingly both of these updates are called "firmware" in various (mixed) documentation and references. The main bootloader which updates the system at boot-time is downloaded from here:

To be honest I expect you only need to do this part once, unless you're uploading your own code to it. The firmware pretty much just boots, and if it finds a magic file on the SD-card it'll copy it into flash. Then it'll either execute this new code, or execute the old/pre-existing code if no update was found.

Anyway get the tarball, extract it, and edit the two files if your serial device is not /dev/ttyUSB0:

  • eraseflash.sh
  • flashall.sh

One you've done that run them both, in order:

$ ./eraseflash.sh
$ ./flashall.sh

NOTE: Here again I had to turn the device off, hold down the volume button, turn it on, and only then execute ./eraseflash.sh. This puts the device into flashing-mode.

NOTE: Here again I had to turn the device off, hold down the volume button, turn it on, and only then execute ./flashall.sh. This puts the device into flashing-mode.

Anyway if that worked you'll see your blue LED flashing on the front of the device. It'll flash quickly to say "Hey there is no file on the SD-card". So we'll carry out the second step - Download and place firmware.bin into the root of your SD-card. This comes from here:

(firmware.bin contains the actual emulators.)

Insert the card. The contents of firmware.bin will be sucked into flash, and you're ready to go. Turn off your toy, remove the SD-card, load it up with games, and reinsert it.

Power on your toy and enjoy your games. Again a simple demo:

Games are laid out in a simple structure:

  ├── firmware.bin
  ├── odroid
  │   ├── data
  │   └── firmware
  └── roms
      ├── gb
      │   └── Tetris (World).gb
      ├── gbc
      ├── gg
      ├── nes
      │   ├── Lifeforce (U).nes
      │   ├── SMB-3.nes
      │   └── Super Bomberman 2 (E) [!].nes
      └── sms

You can find a template here:

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Another golang port, this time a toy virtual machine.

Monday, 2 July 2018

I don't understand why my toy virtual machine has as much interest as it does. It is a simple project that compiles "assembly language" into a series of bytecodes, and then allows them to be executed.

Since I recently started messing around with interpreters more generally I figured I should revisit it. Initially I rewrote the part that interprets the bytecodes in golang, which was simple, but now I've rewritten the compiler too.

Much like the previous work with interpreters this uses a lexer and an evaluator to handle things properly - in the original implementation the compiler used a series of regular expressions to parse the input files. Oops.

Anyway the end result is that I can compile a source file to bytecodes, execute bytecodes, or do both at once:

I made a couple of minor tweaks in the port, because I wanted extra facilities. Rather than implement an opcode "STRING_LENGTH" I copied the idea of traps - so a program can call-back to the interpreter to run some operations:

int 0x00  -> Set register 0 with the length of the string in register 0.

int 0x01  -> Set register 0 with the contents of reading a string from the user

etc.

This notion of traps should allow complex operations to be implemented easily, in golang. I don't think I have the patience to do too much more, but it stands as a simple example of a "compiler" or an interpreter.

I think this program is the longest I've written. Remember how verbose assembly language is?

Otherwise: Helsinki Pride happened, Oiva learned to say his name (maybe?), and I finished reading all the James Bond novels (which were very different to the films, and have aged badly on the whole).

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