Entries tagged email

Related tags: gmime, hashes, lumail, microformats, mime, names, random, spam, storage, templer.

On the names we use in email

Saturday, 18 October 2014

Yesterday I received a small rush of SPAM mails, all of which were 419 scams, and all of them sent by "Mrs Elizabeth PETERSEN".

It struck me that I can't think of ever receiving a legitimate mail from a "Mrs XXX [YYY]", but I was too busy to check.

Today I've done so. Of the 38,553 emails I've received during the month of October 2014 I've got a hell of a lot of mails with a From address including a "Mrs" prefix:

"Mrs.Clanzo Amaki" <marilobouabre14@yahoo.co.jp>
"Mrs Sarah Mamadou"<investment@payment.com>
"Mrs Abia Abrahim" <missfatimajinnah@yahoo.co.jp>
"Mrs. Josie Wilson" <linn3_2008@yahoo.co.jp>
"Mrs. Theresa Luis"<tomaslima@jorgelima.com>

There are thousands more. Not a single one of them was legitimate.

I have one false-positive when repeating the search for a Mr-prefix. I have one friend who has set his sender-address to "Mr Bob Smith", which always reads weirdly to me, but every single other email with a Mr-prefix was SPAM.

I'm not going to use this in any way, since I'm happy with my mail-filtering setup, but it was interesting observation.

Names are funny. My wife changed her surname post-marriage, but that was done largely on the basis that introducing herself as "Doctor Kemp" was simpler than "Doctor Foreign-Name", she'd certainly never introduce herself ever as Mrs Kemp.

Trivia: In Finnish the word for "Man" and "Husband" is the same (mies), but the word for "Woman" (nainen) is different than the word for "Wife" (vaimo).

| 3 comments.

 

A small email utility and other updates.

Thursday, 11 September 2014

Last night I was looking for an image I knew a model had mailed me a few months ago, as we were talking about rescheduling a shoot at the weekend. I couldn't find it, even with my awesome mail client and filing system.

With some free time I figured I could write a little utility to dump all attachments from email folders, and find it that way.

It did cross my mind that there is the simple mail-utility for dumping headers, etc, called formail, which is distributed alongside procmail, but it doesn't handle attachments ..

I was tempted to write a general purpose script to dump attachments, email header values, etc, etc but given the lack of time I merely solved my own problem.

I suspect there is room for a "mail utilities" package, similar to Joey's "moreutils" and my "sysadmin utils". However I note that there is a GNU Mailutils which does things differently than I'd expect - i.e. it contains a POP3 server.

Still if you want to dump attachments from emails, have GMIME installed, and want to filter by attachment-name, or MIME-type, you might look at my trivial attachment-dump program.

Related to that I spent some time last night updating my photography site, so the animals & pets section has updated images at least.

During the course of that I found a bug in my static-site generator, templer which stopped it from automatically populating image height/widths when called in a glob:

Title: Pets &amp; Animals
Images: file_glob( "*.jpg" )
---

This is the page body, it now has access to a variable called 'images'
which is a HTML::Template loop-structure containing name/height/width/etc
for each image in the current directory.

That should now be resolved, and life should once again be good.

| 2 comments.

 

How do people deal with email?

Wednesday, 5 June 2013

As part of writing a new mail client I'm wondering about how to change my email-life, and how other people process/handle their incoming email.

I sort my incoming email into folders at delivery-time using procmail. Mail is generally filtered into mailboxes on the basis of the company that sent it, the person that sent it, or the machine which generated it.

Because I manage a lot of machines personally I've split things up so that I have a folder per host. So on a morning I might have unread mail in the following folders:

machines.steve.org.uk/
machines.da-db1/
machines.da-db2/
machines.da-web1/
machines.da-web2/
machines.da-web3/
machines.da-web4/

The per-machine mailboxes usually contain a single mail every day from LogWatch, along with output from any cron-jobs. For example today I received the mail:

From: Cron Daemon
To: steve@steve.org.uk
Subject: Cron steve@steve.org.uk /home/steve/bin/download-check

URL http://nodejs.org/ - no longer matches v0.10.9

Generally speaking I don't need to read the per-machine messages. I'll keep the most recent 100 for reference, but only need to look if something seems "off" on a machine. But if I don't look I'd not see the node upgrade notice, so find that I do read them after all.

This suggest to me that email isn't the right way to handle this kind of thing. Instead I should use a notification system - at work we have a central service called MauveAlert (yes, Red Dwarf reference). Mauve receives "alerts" of various kinds, via UDP. The alerts are then fanned out to appropriate people via XMPP, Email, or SMSs.

I have a similarly-inspired system I use on my Debian Administration cluster. A (node) service runs non-stop collecting UDP messages and showing them on a dashboard. I look at it throughout the day to see when slaughter runs, etc.

Anyway in conslusion I get a lot of mail. Some of it is related to random projects, and all ends up in the steve.org.uk/ mailbox, some of it relates to machines, and gets filed away, and I have regular conversions with folk so I have a .people.kirsi/ folder which receives a lot of attention, for example.

ObRandom:daily() - Mark ~/Maildir/.machines.*, etc, read.

| 8 comments.

 

So mega-upload is gone

Saturday, 21 January 2012

So the site http://megaupload.com/ has been taken offline, amidst allegations of knowingly conducting in piracy.

There are probably a lot of legitimate users who have lost access to their uploaded files, even if they were offsite backups you can imagine a user owning a website which now has a million dead-links.

This reminds me of a conversation I overheard on Jon Dowlands blog - the summary is that he'd written a (useful) tool to extract attachments from Maildir folders and was wondering how to store and access those attachments. The upshot seemed to be magical URLs of the form:

  • https://file.example.com/sha1/509c2fe2eba509e93987c3024a74d74583c274bd

The comments covered an alternative which was hash:///sha1/xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx, which then becomes close to the magnet:// schema.

I've not yet thought things through, but I can't help thinking that with the redundency already present in the internet we should be looking at non-server-specific links. Yes there are times right now when you might want to address a specific file on a specific server - but otherwise? Wouldn't it be nice if you could just access a file from "anywhere" which happened to have the right contents?

Already my nonporn-but-definitely-adult-site makes its images available as /img/$md5sum.jpg - and similarly the storage at the back-end of my random image upload site uses SHA1 hashes to store the actual files.

To make this more complete what we need is something that crawls the internet to find files by hash; then add support in browsers. Obviously this must be async and could introduce timing issues, but fundamentally it seems like a reasonable approach to the problem of a single host going offline.

(Consider what happens if imgur.com disappears. All those links would die, yet 99% of the images would still be available somewhere.)

I'm tempted to suggest microformat format but I need to consider the matter. Right now I'm going to immediately update my current image hosts to use, at the very least:

 <a href="/foo" rel="sha1:xxxxx md5sum:xxxx">
  <img src="foo.jpg" alt="img name">
 </a>

The unfortunate thing is you cannot have a 'rel="xx"' attribute for an image. So you either have to encode it in the parent link, or add it to the alt attribute which is suboptimal.

ObQuote: "Now, they tell me I paid my debt to society." - Oceans Eleven (2001)

| 3 comments.

 

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