Entries tagged monkey

Related tags: golang, intepreters.

Pulling back

Saturday, 29 September 2018

I've updated my fork of the monkey programming language to allow object-based method calls.

That's allowed me to move some of my "standard-library" code into Monkey, and out of Go which is neat. This is a simple example:

 //
 // Reverse a string,
 //
 function string.reverse() {
   let r= "";
   let l = len(self);

   for( l > 0 ) {
      r += self[l-1];
      l--;
   }
   return r;
 }

Usage is the obvious:

  puts( "Steve".reverse() );

Or:

  let s = "Input";
  s = s.reverse();
  puts( s + "\n" );

Most of the pain here was updating the parser to recognize that "." meant a method-call was happening, once that was done it was otherwise only a matter of passing the implicit self object to the appropriate functions.

This work was done in a couple of 30-60 minute chunks. I find that I'm only really able to commit to that amount of work these days, so I've started to pull back from other projects.

Oiva is now 21 months old and he sucks up all my time & energy. I can't complain, but equally I can't really start concentrating on longer-projects even when he's gone to sleep.

And that concludes my news for the day.

Goodnight dune..

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Monkeying around with intepreters - Result

Monday, 18 June 2018

So I challenged myself to writing a BASIC intepreter over the weekend, unfortunately I did not succeed.

What I did was take an existing monkey-repl and extend it with a series of changes to make sure that I understood all the various parts of the intepreter design.

Initially I was just making basic changes:

  • Added support for single-line comments.
    • For example "// This is a comment".
  • Added support for multi-line comments.
    • For example "/* This is a multi-line comment */".
  • Expand \n and \t in strings.
  • Allow the index operation to be applied to strings.
    • For example "Steve Kemp"[0] would result in S.
  • Added a type function.
    • For example "type(3.13)" would return "float".
    • For example "type(3)" would return "integer".
    • For example "type("Moi")" would return "string".

Once I did that I overhauled the built-in functions, allowing callers to register golang functions to make them available to their monkey-scripts. Using this I wrote a simple "standard library" with some simple math, string, and file I/O functions.

The end result was that I could read files, line-by-line, or even just return an array of the lines in a file:

 // "wc -l /etc/passwd" - sorta
 let lines = file.lines( "/etc/passwd" );
 if ( lines ) {
    puts( "Read ", len(lines), " lines\n" )
 }

Adding file I/O was pretty neat, although I only did reading. Handling looping over a file-contents is a little verbose:

 // wc -c /etc/passwd, sorta.
 let handle = file.open("/etc/passwd");
 if ( handle < 0 ) {
   puts( "Failed to open file" )
 }

 let c = 0;       // count of characters
 let run = true;  // still reading?

 for( run == true ) {

    let r = read(handle);
    let l = len(r);
    if ( l > 0 ) {
        let c = c + l;
    }
    else {
        let run = false;
    }
 };

 puts( "Read " , c, " characters from file.\n" );
 file.close(handle);

This morning I added some code to interpolate hash-values into a string:

 // Hash we'll interpolate from
 let data = { "Name":"Steve", "Contact":"+358449...", "Age": 41 };

 // Expand the string using that hash
 let out = string.interpolate( "My name is ${Name}, I am ${Age}", data );

 // Show it worked
 puts(out + "\n");

Finally I added some type-conversions, allowing strings/floats to be converted to integers, and allowing other value to be changed to strings. With the addition of a math.random function we then got:

 // math.random() returns a float between 0 and 1.
 let rand = math.random();

 // modify to make it from 1-10 & show it
 let val = int( rand * 10 ) + 1 ;
 puts( "math.random() -> ", val , "\n");

The only other signification change was the addition of a new form of function definition. Rather than defining functions like this:

 let hello = fn() { puts( "Hello, world\n" ) };

I updated things so that you could also define a function like this:

 function hello() { puts( "Hello, world\n" ) };

(The old form still works, but this is "clearer" in my eyes.)

Maybe next weekend I'll try some more BASIC work, though for the moment I think my monkeying around is done. The world doesn't need another scripting language, and as I mentioned there are a bunch of implementations of this around.

The new structure I made makes adding a real set of standard-libraries simple, and you could embed the project, but I'm struggling to think of why you would want to. (Though I guess you could pretend you're embedding something more stable than anko and not everybody loves javascript as a golang extension language.)

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Monkeying around with intepreters

Saturday, 16 June 2018

Recently I've had an overwhelming desire to write a BASIC intepreter. I can't think why, but the idea popped into my mind, and wouldn't go away.

So I challenged myself to spend the weekend looking at it.

Writing an intepreter is pretty well-understood problem:

  • Parse the input into tokens, such as "LET", "GOTO", "INT:3"
    • This is called lexical analysis / lexing.
  • Taking those tokens and building an abstract syntax tree.
    • The AST
  • Walking the tree, evaluating as you go.
    • Hey ho.

Of course BASIC is annoying because a program is prefixed by line-numbers, for example:

 10 PRINT "HELLO, WORLD"
 20 GOTO 10

The naive way of approaching this is to repeat the whole process for each line. So a program would consist of an array of input-strings each line being treated independently.

Anyway reminding myself of all this fun took a few hours, and during the course of that time I came across Writing an intepreter in Go which seems to be well-regarded. The book walks you through creating an interpreter for a language called "Monkey".

I found a bunch of implementations, which were nice and clean. So to give myself something to do I started by adding a new built-in function rnd(). Then I tested this:

let r = 0;
let c = 0;

for( r != 50 ) {
   let r = rnd();
   let c = c + 1;
}

puts "It took ";
puts c;
puts " attempts to find a random-number equalling 50!";

Unfortunately this crashed. It crashed inside the body of the loop, and it seemed that the projects I looked at each handled the let statement in a slightly-odd way - the statement wouldn't return a value, and would instead fall-through a case statement, hitting the next implementation.

For example in monkey-intepreter we see that happen in this section. (Notice how there's no return after the env.Set call?)

So I reported this as a meta-bug to the book author. It might be the master source is wrong, or might be that the unrelated individuals all made the same error - meaning the text is unclear.

Anyway the end result is I have a language, in go, that I think I understand and have been able to modify. Now I'll have to find some time to go back to BASIC-work.

I found a bunch of basic-intepreters, including ubasic, but unfortunately almost all of them were missing many many features - such as implementing operations like RND(), ABS(), COS().

Perhaps room for another interpreter after all!

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