Entries tagged serverless

Related tags: docker, golang.

Serverless deployment via docker

Monday, 19 March 2018

I've been thinking about serverless-stuff recently, because I've been re-deploying a bunch of services and some of them could are almost microservices. One thing that a lot of my things have in common is that they're all simple HTTP-servers, presenting an API or end-point over HTTP. There is no state, no database, and no complex dependencies.

These should be prime candidates for serverless deployment, but at the same time I don't want to have to recode them for AWS Lamda, or any similar locked-down service. So docker is the obvious answer.

Let us pretend I have ten HTTP-based services, each of which each binds to port 8000. To make these available I could just setup a simple HTTP front-end:

  • https://api.example.fi/

We'd need to route the request to the appropriate back-end, so we'd start to present URLs like:

  • https://api.example.fi/steve/foo
  • https://api.example.fi/steve/bar

Here any request which had the prefix steve/foo would be routed to a running instance of the docker container steve/foo. In short the name of the (first) path component performs the mapping to the back-end.

I wrote a quick hack, in golang, which would bind to port 80 and dynamically launch the appropriate containers, then proxy back and forth. I soon realized that this is a terrible idea though! The problem is a malicious client could start making requests for things like:

  • https://api.example.fi/wordpress/wordpress
  • https://api.example.fi/blah/blah

That would trigger my API-proxy to download the containers and spin them up. Allowing running arbitrary (albeit "sandboxed") code. So taking a step back, we want to use the path-component of an URL to decide where to route the traffic? Each container will bind to :8000 on its private (docker) IP? There's an obvious solution here: HAProxy.

So I started again, I wrote a trivial golang deamon which will react to docker events - containers starting and stopping - and generate a suitable haproxy configuration file, which can then be used to reload haproxy.

The end result is that if I launch a container named "foo" then requests to http://api.example.fi/foo will reach it. Success! The only downside to this approach is that you must manually launch your back-end docker containers - but if you do so they'll become immediately available.

I guess there is another advantage. Since you're launching the containers (manually) you can setup links, volumes, and what-not. Much more so than if your API layer span them up with zero per-container knowledge.

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