Entries tagged travis

Related tags: automation, github, golang.

Experimenting with github actions

Tuesday, 26 February 2019

Recently I heared that travis-CI had been bought out, and later that they'd started to fire their staff.

I've used Travis-CI for a few years now, via github, to automatically build binaries for releases, and to run tests.

Since I was recently invited to try the Github Actions beta I figured it was time to experiment.

Github actions allow you to trigger "stuff" on "actions". Actions are things like commits being pushed to your repository, new releases appearing, and so on. "Stuff" is basically "launch a specific docker container".

The specified docker container has a copy of your project repository cloned into it, and you can operate upon it pretty freely.

I created two actions (which basically means I authored two Dockerfiles), and setup the meta-information, so that now I can do what I used to do with travis easily:

  • github-action-tester
    • Allows tests to be run whenever a new commit is pushed to your repository.
    • Or whenever a pull-request is submitted, or updated.
  • github-actions-publish-binaries
    • If you create a new release in the github UI your project is built, and the specified binaries are attached to the release.

Configuring these in the repository is very simple, you have to define a workflow at .github/main.workflow, and my projects tend to look very similar:

  # pushes trigger the testsuite
  workflow "Push Event" {
    on = "push"
    resolves = ["Test"]
  }

  # pull-requests trigger the testsuite
  workflow "Pull Request" {
    on = "pull_request"
    resolves = ["Test"]
  }

  # releases trigger new binary artifacts
  workflow "Handle Release" {
    on = "release"
    resolves = ["Upload"]
  }

  ##
  ## The actions
  ##

  ##
  ## Run the test-cases, via .github/run-tests.sh
  ##
  action "Test" {
     uses = "skx/github-action-tester@master"
  }

  ##
  ## Build the binaries, via .github/build, then upload them.
  ##
  action "Upload" {
    uses = "skx/github-action-publish-binaries@master"
    args = "math-compiler-*"
    secrets = ["GITHUB_TOKEN"]
  }

In order to make the actions generic they both execute a shell-script inside your repository. For example the action to run the tests just executes

  • .github/run-tests.sh

That way you can write the tests that make sense. For example a golang application would probably run go test ..., but a C-based system might run make test.

Similarly the release-making action runs .github/build, and assumes that will produce your binaries, which are then uploaded.

The upload-action requires the use of a secret, but it seems to be handled by magic - I didn't create one. I suspect GITHUB_TOKEN is a magic-secret which is generated on-demand.

Anyway I updated a few projects, and you can see their configuration by looking at .github within the repository:

All in all it was worth the few hours I spent on it, and now I no longer use Travis-CI. The cost? I guess now I'm tied to github some more...

| No comments

 

Recent Posts

Recent Tags