Entries posted in February 2016

If line-noise is a program, all fuzzers are developers

Monday, 29 February 2016

Recently I had a conversation with a programmer who repeated the adage that programming in perl consists of writing line-noise. This isn't true but it reminded me of my love of fuzzers. Fuzzers are often used to generate random input files which are fed to tools, looking for security problems, segfaults, and similar hilarity.

To the untrained eye the output of most fuzzers is essentially line-noise, since you often start with a valid input file and start flipping bits, swapping bytes, and appending garbage.

Anyway this made me wonder what happens if you fed random garbage into a perl interpreter? I wasn't brave enough to try it, because knowing my luck the fuzzer would write a program like so:

system( "rm -rf /home/steve" );

But I figured it was still an interesting idea, and I could have a go at fuzzing something else. I picked gawk, the GNU implementation of awk because the codebase is pretty small, and I understand it reasonably well.

Almost immediately my fuzzer found some interesting segfaults and problems. Here's a nice simple example:

 $ gawk 'for (i = ) in steve kemp rocks'
 ..
 gawk: cmd. line:1: fatal error: internal error: segfault
 Aborted

I look forward to seeing what happens when other people fuzz perl..

| 5 comments.

 

Redesigning my clustered website

Sunday, 7 February 2016

I'm slowly planning the redesign of the cluster which powers the Debian Administration website.

Currently the design is simple, and looks like this:

In brief there is a load-balancer that handles SSL-termination and then proxies to one of four Apache servers. These talk back and forth to a MySQL database. Nothing too shocking, or unusual.

(In truth there are two database servers, and rather than a single installation of HAProxy it runs upon each of the webservers - One is the master which is handled via ucarp. Logically though traffic routes through HAProxy to a number of Apache instances. I can lose half of the servers and things still keep running.)

When I setup the site it all ran on one host, it was simpler, it was less highly available. It also struggled to cope with the load.

Half the reason for writing/hosting the site in the first place was to document learning experiences though, so when it came to time to make it scale I figured why not learn something and do it neatly? Having it run on cheap and reliable virtual hosts was a good excuse to bump the server-count and the design has been stable for the past few years.

Recently though I've begun planning how it will be deployed in the future and I have a new design:

Rather than having the Apache instances talk to the database I'll indirect through an API-server. The API server will handle requests like these:

  • POST /users/login
    • POST a username/password and return 200 if valid. If bogus details return 403. If the user doesn't exist return 404.
  • GET /users/Steve
    • Return a JSON hash of user-information.
    • Return 404 on invalid user.

I expect to have four API handler endpoints: /articles, /comments, /users & /weblogs. Again we'll use a floating IP and a HAProxy instance to route to multiple API-servers. Each of which will use local caching to cache articles, etc.

This should turn the middle layer, running on Apache, into simpler things, and increase throughput. I suspect, but haven't confirmed, that making a single HTTP-request to fetch a (formatted) article body will be cheaper than making N-database queries.

Anyway that's what I'm slowly pondering and working on at the moment. I wrote a proof of concept API-server based CMS two years ago, and my recollection of that time is that it was fast to develop, and easy to scale.

| 8 comments.

 

Best practice - Don't serve writeable PHP files

Tuesday, 2 February 2016

I deal with compromises often enough of PHP-based websites that I wish to improve hardening.

One obvious way to improve things is to not serve PHP files which are writeable by the webserver-user. This would ensure that things like wp-content/uploads didn't get served as PHP if a compromise wrote valid PHP there.

In the past using php5-suhosin would have allowd this via the suhosin.executor.include.allow_writable_files flag.

Since suhosin is no longer supported under Debian Jessie I wonder if there is a simple way to achieve this?

I've written a toy-module which allows me to call stat on every request, and return a 403 on access to writeable files/directories. But it seems like I shouldn't need to write my own code for this functionality.

Any pointers welcome; happy to post my code if that is useful but suspect not - it just shouldn't exist.

| 11 comments.

 

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