Entries posted in December 2016

So I'm gonna start doing arduino-things

Saturday, 31 December 2016

Since I've got a few weeks off I've decided I need to find a project, or two, to occupy me. Happily the baby is settling in well, mostly he sleeps for 4-5 hours, then eats, before the cycle repeats. It could have been so much worse.

My plan is to start exploring Arduino-related projects. It has been years since I touched hardware, with the exception of building a new PC for myself every 12-48 months.

There are a few "starter kits" you can buy, consisting of a board, and some discrete components such as a bunch of buttons, an LCD-output screen, some sensors (pressure, water, tilt), etc.

There are also some nifty little pre-cooked components you can buy such as:

The appeal of the former is that I can get the hang of marrying hardware with software, and the appeal of the latter is that the whole thing is pre-built, so I don't need to worry about anything complex. Looking over similar builds people have made, the process is more akin to building with Lego than real hardware-assembling.

So, for the next few weeks my plan is to :

  • Explore the various sensors, and tutorials, via the starter-kit.
  • Wire the MP3-playback device to a wireless D1-mini-board.
    • Which will allow me to listen to (static) music stored on an SD-card.
    • And sending "next", "previous", "play", "volume-up", etc, via a mobile.

The end result should be that I will be able to listen to music in my living room. Albeit in a constrained fashion (if I want to change the music I'll have to swap out the files on the SD-card). But it's something that's vaguely useful, and something that I think is within my capability, even as a beginner.

I'm actually not sure what else I could usefully do, but I figured I could probably wire up a vibration sensor to another wireless board. The device can sit on the top of my washing machine:

  • If vibration is sensed move into the "washing is on" state.
    • If vibration stops after a few minutes move into the "washing machine done" state.
      • Send a HTTP GET-request, which will trigger an SMS/similar.

There's probably more to it than that, but I expect that a simple vibration sensor will be sufficient to allow me to get an alert of some kind when the washing machine is ready to be emptied - and I don't need to poke inside the guts of the washing machine, nor hang reed-switches off the door, etc.

Anyway the only downside to my plan is that no doubt shipping the toys from AliExpress will take 2-4 weeks. Oops.

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I finally made something worthwhile.

Monday, 26 December 2016

So for once I made something useful.

Snuggles

Oiva Adam Kemp.

Happy Christmas, if you believe in that kind of thing.

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A simple Perl alternative to storing data in Redis

Friday, 16 December 2016

I continue to be a big user of Perl, and for many of my sites I avoid the use of MySQL which means that I largely store data in flat files, SQLite databases, or in memory via Redis.

One of my servers was recently struggling with RAM, and the suprising cause was "too much data" in Redis. (Surprising because I'd not been paying attention and seen how popular it was, and also because ASCII text compresses pretty well).

Read/Write speed isn't a real concern, so I figured I'd move the data into an SQLite database, but that would require rewriting the application.

The client library for Perl is pretty awesome, and simple usage looks like this:

# Connect to localhost.
my $r = Redis->new()

# simple storage
$r->set( "key", "value" );

# Work with sets
$r->sadd( "fruits", "orange" );
$r->sadd( "fruits", "apple" );
$r->sadd( "fruits", "blueberry" );
$r->sadd( "fruits", "banannanananananarama" );

# Show the set-count
print "There are " . $r->scard( "fruits" ) . " known fruits";

# Pick a random one
print "Here is a random one " . $r->srandmember( "fruits" ) . "\n";

I figured, if I ignored the Lua support and the other more complex operations, creating a compatible API implementation wouldn't be too hard. So rather than porting my application to using SQLite directly I could juse use a different client-library.

In short I change this:

use Redis;
my $r = Redis->new();

To this:

use Redis::SQLite;
my $r = Redis::SQLite->new();

And everything continues to work. I've implemented all the set-related functions except one, and a random smattering of the other simple operations.

The appropriate test-cases in the Redis client library (i.e. removing all references to things I didn't implement) pass, and my own new tests also make me confident.

It's obviously not a hard job, but it was a quick solution to a real problem and might be useful to others.

My image hosting site, and my markdown sharing site now both use this wrapper and seem to be performing well - but with more free RAM.

No doubt I'll add more of the simple primitives as time goes on, but so far I've done enough to be useful.

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