Entries tagged github

Related tags: audio, bookmarks, coding, file-hosting, git, go, golang, ipv6, lumail, node, pass, perl, procmail, random, security, serverspec, sinatra, slaughter, squeezebox, streaming, sysadmin, sysadmin-util, templer, yawns.

All about sharing files easily

Sunday, 13 September 2015

Although I've been writing a bit recently about file-storage, this post is about something much more simple: Just making a random file or two available on an ad-hoc basis.

In the past I used to have my email and website(s) hosted on the same machine, and that machine was well connected. Making a file visible just involved running ~/bin/publish, which used scp to write a file beneath an apache document-root.

These days I use "my computer", "my work computer", and "my work laptop", amongst other hosts. The SSH-keys required to access my personal boxes are not necessarily available on all of these hosts. Add in firewall constraints and suddenly there isn't an obvious way for me to say "Publish this file online, and show me the root".

I asked on twitter but nothing useful jumped out. So I ended up writing a simple server, via sinatra which would allow:

  • Login via the site, and a browser. The login-form looks sexy via bootstrap.
  • Upload via a web-form, once logged in. The upload-form looks sexy via bootstrap.
  • Or, entirely seperately, with HTTP-basic-auth and a HTTP POST (i.e. curl)

This worked, and was even secure-enough, given that I run SSL if you import my CA file.

But using basic auth felt like cheating, and I've been learning more Go recently, and I figured I should start taking it more seriously, so I created a small repository of learning-programs. The learning programs started out simply, but I did wire up a simple TOTP authenticator.

Having TOTP available made me rethink things - suddenly even if you're not using SSL having an eavesdropper doesn't compromise future uploads.

I'd also spent a few hours working out how to make extensible commands in go, the kind of thing that lets you run:

cmd sub-command1 arg1 arg2
cmd sub-command2 arg1 .. argN

The solution I came up with wasn't perfect, but did work, and allow the seperation of different sub-command logic.

So suddenly I have the ability to run "subcommands", and the ability to authenticate against a time-based secret. What is next? Well the hard part with golang is that there are so many things to choose from - I went with gorilla/mux as my HTTP-router, then I spend several hours filling in the blanks.

The upshot is now that I have a TOTP-protected file upload site:

publishr init    - Generates the secret
publishr secret  - Shows you the secret for import to your authenticator
publishr serve   - Starts the HTTP daemon

Other than a lack of comments, and test-cases, it is complete. And stand-alone. Uploads get dropped into ./public, and short-links are generated for free.

If you want to take a peak the code is here:

The only annoyance is the handling of dependencies - which need to be "go got ..". I guess I need to look at godep or similar, for my next learning project.

I guess there's a minor gain in making this service available via golang. I've gained protection against replay attacks, assuming non-SSL environment, and I've simplified deployment. The downside is I can no longer login over the web, and I must use curl, or similar, to upload. Acceptible tradeoff.

| 2 comments.

 

IPv6 only server

Sunday, 2 November 2014

I enjoy the tilde.club site/community, and since I've just setup an IPv6-only host I was looking to do something similar.

Unfortunately my (working) code to clone github repositories into per-user directories fails - because github isn't accessible over IPv6.

That's a shame.

Oddly enough chromium, the browser packaged for wheezy, doesn't want to display IPv6-only websites either. For example this site fail to load http://ipv6.steve.org.uk/.

In the meantime I've got a server setup which is only accessible over IPv6 and I'm a little smug. (http://ipv6.website/).

(Yes it is true that I've used all the IPv4 addreses allocated to my VLAN. That's just a coincidence. Ssh!)

| 6 comments.

 

Migration of services and hosts

Friday, 29 August 2014

Yesterday I carried out the upgrade of a Debian host from Squeeze to Wheezy for a friend. I like doing odd-jobs like this as they're generally painless, and when there are problems it is a fun learning experience.

I accidentally forgot to check on the status of the MySQL server on that particular host, which was a little embarassing, but later put together a reasonably thorough serverspec recipe to describe how the machine should be setup, which will avoid that problem in the future - Introduction/tutorial here.

The more I use serverspec the more I like it. My own personal servers have good rules now:

shelob ~/Repos/git.steve.org.uk/server/testing $ make
..
Finished in 1 minute 6.53 seconds
362 examples, 0 failures

Slow, but comprehensive.

In other news I've now migrated every single one of my personal mercurial repositories over to git. I didn't have a particular reason for doing that, but I've started using git more and more for collaboration with others and using two systems felt like an annoyance.

That means I no longer have to host two different kinds of repositories, and I can use the excellent gitbucket software on my git repository host.

Needless to say I wrote a policy for this host too:

#
#  The host should be wheezy.
#
describe command("lsb_release -d") do
  its(:stdout) { should match /wheezy/ }
end


#
# Our gitbucket instance should be running, under runit.
#
describe supervise('gitbucket') do
  its(:status) { should eq 'run' }
end

#
# nginx will proxy to our back-end
#
describe service('nginx') do
  it { should be_enabled   }
  it { should be_running   }
end
describe port(80) do
  it { should be_listening }
end

#
#  Host should resolve
#
describe host("git.steve.org.uk" ) do
  it { should be_resolvable.by('dns') }
end

Simple stuff, but being able to trigger all these kind of tests, on all my hosts, with one command, is very reassuring.

| 1 comment.

 

Updates on git-hosting and load-balancing

Monday, 25 August 2014

To round up the discussion of the Debian Administration site yesterday I flipped the switch on the load-balancing. Rather than this:

  https -> pound \
                  \
  http  -------------> varnish  --> apache

We now have the simpler route for all requests:

http  -> haproxy -> apache
https -> haproxy -> apache

This means we have one less HTTP-request for all incoming secure connections, and these days secure connections are preferred since a Strict-Transport-Security header is set.

In other news I've been juggling git repositories; I've setup an installation of GitBucket on my git-host. My personal git repository used to contain some private repositories and some mirrors.

Now it contains mirrors of most things on github, as well as many more private repositories.

The main reason for the switch was to get a prettier interface and bug-tracker support.

A side-benefit is that I can use "groups" to organize repositories, so for example:

Most of those are mirrors of the github repositories, but some are new. When signed in I see more sources, for example the source to http://steve.org.uk.

I've been pleased with the setup and performance, though I had to add some caching and some other magic at the nginx level to provide /robots.txt, etc, which are not otherwise present.

I'm not abandoning github, but I will no longer be using it for private repositories (I was gifted a free subscription a year or three ago), and nor will I post things there exclusively.

If a single canonical source location is required for a repository it will be one that I control, maintain, and host.

I don't expect I'll give people commit access on this mirror, but it is certainly possible. In the past I've certainly given people access to private repositories for collaboration, etc.

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So I bought some new hardware, for audio purposes.

Thursday, 6 March 2014

This week I received a logitech squeezebox radio, which is basically an expensive toy that allows you to listen to either "internet radio", or music streamed from your own PC via a portable device that accesses the network wirelessly.

The main goal of this purchase was to allow us to listen to media stored on a local computer in the bedroom, or living-room.

The hardware scans your network looking for a media server, so the first step is to install that:

The media-server has a couple of open ports; one for streaming the media, and one for a user-browsable HTML interface. Interestingly the radio-device shows up in the web-interface, so you can mess around with the currently loaded playlist from your office, while your wife is casually listening to music in the bedroom. (I'm not sure if that's a feature or not yet ;)

Although I didn't find any alternative server-implementations I did find a software-client which you can use to play music from the central server - slimp3slave - and again you can push playlists, media, etc, to this.

My impressions are pretty positive; the device was too expensive, certainly I wouldn't buy two, but it is functional. The user-interface is decent, and the software being available and open is a big win.

Downsides? No remote-control for the player, because paying an additional £70 is never going to happen, but otherwise I can't think of anything.

(Shame the squeezebox product line seems to have been cancelled (?))

Procmail Alternatives?

Although I did start hacking a C & Lua alternative, it looks like there are enough implementations out there that I don't feel so strongly any more.

I'm working in a different way to most people, rather than sort mails at delivery time I'm going to write a trivial daemon that will just watch ~/Maildir/.Incoming, and move mails out of there. That means that no errors will cause mail to be lost at SMTP/delivery time.

I'm going to base my work on Email::Filter since it offers 90% of the primitives I want. The only missing thing is the ability to filter mails via external commands which has now been reported as a bug/omission.

| 10 comments.

 

Anti-social coding

Monday, 3 March 2014

I get all excited when I load up Github's front-page and see something like:

"robyn has forked skx/xxx to robyn/xxx"

I wonder what they will do, what changes do they have in mind?

Days pass, and no commits happen.

Anti-social coding: Cloning the code, I guess in case I delete my repository, but not intending to make any changes.

| 9 comments.

 

A good week?

Sunday, 29 December 2013

This week my small collection of sysadmin tools received a lot of attention; I've no idea what triggered it, but it ended up on the front-page of github as a "trending repository".

Otherwise I've recently spent some time "playing about" with some security stuff. My first recent report wasn't deemed worthy of a security update, but it was still a fun one. From the package description rush is described as:

GNU Rush is a restricted shell designed for sites providing only limited access to resources for remote users. The main binary executable is configurable as a user login shell, intended for users that only are allowed remote login to the system at hand.

As the description says this is primarily intended for use by remote users, but if it is installed locally you can read "any file" on the local system.

How? Well the program is setuid(root) and allows you to specify an arbitrary configuration file as input. The very very first thing I tried to do with this program was feed it an invalid and unreadable-to-me configuration file.

Helpfully there is a debugging option you can add --lint to help you setup the software. Using it is as simple as:

shelob ~ $ rush --lint /etc/shadow
rush: Info: /etc/shadow:1: unknown statement: root:$6$zwJQWKVo$ofoV2xwfsff...Mxo/:15884:0:99999:7:::
rush: Info: /etc/shadow:2: unknown statement: daemon:*:15884:0:99999:7:::
rush: Info: /etc/shadow:3: unknown statement: bin:*:15884:0:99999:7:::
rush: Info: /etc/shadow:4: unknown statement: sys:*:15884:0:99999:7:::
..

How nice?

The only mitigating factor here is that only the first token on the line is reported - In this case we've exposed /etc/shadow which doesn't contain whitespace for the interesting users, so it's enough to start cracking those password hashes.

If you maintain a setuid binary you must be trying things like this.

If you maintain a setuid binary you must be confident in the codebase.

People will be happy to stress-test, audit, examine, and help you - just ask.

Simple security issues like this are frankly embarassing.

Anyway that's enough: #733505 / CVE-2013-6889.

| No comments

 

So PaaS

Friday, 6 December 2013

I just realised a lot of my projects are deployed in the same way:

  • They run under runit.
  • They operate directly from git clones.

This includes both Apache-based projects, and node.js projects.

I'm sure I could generalize this, and do clever things with git-hooks. Right now for example I have run-scripts which look like this:

#!/bin/sh
#
# /etc/service/blogspam.js/run - Runs the blogspam.net API.
#


# update the repository.
git pull --update --quiet

# install dependencies, if appropriate.
npm install

# launche
exec node server.js

It seems the only thing that differs is the name of the directory and the remote git clone URL.

With a bit of scripting magic I'm sure you could push applications to a virgin Debian installation and have it do the right thing.

I think the only obvious thing I'm missing is a list of Debian dependencies. Perhaps adding soemthing like the packages.json file I could add an extra step:

apt-get update -qq
apt-get install --yes --force-yes $(cat packages.apt)

Making deployments easy is a good thing, and consistency helps..

| 2 comments.

 

Lack of referrers on github is an annoyance

Monday, 26 August 2013

Github is a nice site, and I routinely monitor a couple of projects there.

I've also been using it to host a couple of my own projects, initially as an experiment, but since then because it has been useful to get followers and visibility.

I'm a little disappointed that you don't get to see more data though; today my sysadmin utilities repository received several new "stars". Given that these all occurred "an hour ago" it seems likely that they we referenced in a comment somewhere on LWN, hacker news, or similar.

Unfortunately I've no clue where that happened, or if it was a coincidence.

I expect this is more of a concern for those users who use github-pages, where having access to the access.logs would be more useful still. But ..

| 3 comments.

 

Some good, some bad

Tuesday, 14 May 2013

Today my main machine was down for about 8 hours. Oops.

That meant when I got home, after a long and dull train journey, I received a bunch of mails from various hosts each saying:

  • Failed to fetch slaughter policies from rsync://www.steve.org.uk/slaughter

Slaughter is my sysadmin utility which pulls policies/recipies from a central location and applies them to the local host.

Slaughter has a bunch of different transports, which are the means by which policies and files are transferred from the remote "central host" to the local machine. Since git is supported I've now switched my policies to be fetched from the master github repository.

This means:

  • All my servers need git installed. Which was already the case.
  • I can run one less service on my main box.
  • We now have a contest: Is my box more reliable than github?

In other news I've fettled with lumail a bit this week, but I'm basically doing nothing until I've pondered my way out of the hole I've dug myself into.

Like mutt lumail has the notion of "limiting" the display of things:

  • Show all maildirs.
  • Show all maildirs with new mail in them.
  • Show all maildirs that match a pattern.
  • Show all messages in the currently selected folder(s)
    • More than one folder may be selected :)
  • Shall all unread messages in the currently selected folder(s).

Unfortunately the latter has caused an annoying, and anticipated, failure case. If you open a folder and cause it to only show unread messages all looks good. Until you read a message. At which point it is no longer allowed to be displayed, so it disappears. Since you were reading a message the next one is opened instead. WHich then becomes marked as read, and no longer should be displayed, because we've said "show me new/unread-only messages please".

The net result is if you show only unread messages and make the mistake of reading one .. you quickly cycle through reading all of them, and are left with an empty display. As each message in turn is opened, read, and marked as non-new.

There are solutions, one of which I documented on the issue. But this has a bad side-effect that message navigation is suddenly complicated in ways that are annoying.

For the moment I'm mulling the problem over and I will only make trivial cleanup changes until I've got my head back in the game and a good solution that won't cause me more pain.

| 6 comments.

 

The rain in Scotland mainly makes me code

Saturday, 11 May 2013

Lumail <http://lumail.org> received two patches today, one to build on Debian Unstable, and one to build on OpenBSD.

The documentation of the lua primitives is almost 100% complete, and the repository has now got a public list of issues which I'm slowly working on.

Even though I can't reply to messages I'm cheerfully running it on my mail box as a mail-viewer. Faster than mutt. Oddly enough. Or maybe I'm just biased.

| No comments

 

sysadmin tools

Tuesday, 16 April 2013

This may be useful, may become useful, or may not:

| 2 comments.

 

Want to fight about it?

Sunday, 24 March 2013

So via hackernews I recently learned about fight code, and my efforts have been fun. Currently my little robot is ranked ~400, but it seems to jump around a fair bit.

Otherwise I've done little coding recently:

I'm pondering libpcap a little, for work purposes. There is a plan to write a deamon which will count incoming SYN packets, per-IP, and drop access to clients that make "too many" requests "too quickly".

This plan is a simple anti-DoS tool which might or might not work in the real world. We do have a couple of clients that seem to be DoS magnets and this is better than using grep + sort against apache access logs.

For cases where a small number of source IPs make many-many requests it will help. For the class of attacks where a huge botnet has members making only a couple of requests each it won't do anything useful.

We'll see how it turns out.

| 2 comments.

 

Template systems redux.

Sunday, 30 December 2012

People seemed interested in my mini-reviews of static-site generators.

I promised to review more in the future, and so to shame myself into doing so I present:

As you can see I've listed my requirements, and I've included a project for each of the tools I've tested.

I will continue to update as I go through more testing. As previously mentioned symlink-handling is the thing that kills a lot of tools.

| No comments

 

More polish for slaughter

Saturday, 29 December 2012

A couple of days ago I made a new release of slaughter, to add a new primitive I was sorely missing:

if ( 1 != IdenticalContents( File1 => "/etc/foo" ,
                             File2 => "/etc/bar" ) )
{
   # do something because the file contents differ
}

This allows me to stop blindly over-writing files if they are identical already.

As part of that work I figured I should be more "visible", so on that basis I've done two things:

After sanity-checking my policies I'm confident I'm not leaking anything I wish to keep private - but there is some news being disclosed ;)

Now that is done I think there shouldn't be any major slaughter-changes for the forseeable future; I'm managing about ten hosts with it now, and being perl it suits my needs. The transport system is flexible enough to suit most folk, and there are adequate facilities for making local additions without touching the core so if people do want to do new things they don't need me to make changes - hopefully.

ObQuote: "Yippee-ki-yay" - Die Hard, the ultimate Christmas film.

| 1 comment.

 

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